“The Pursuit of Development” by Ian Goldin

A Lecture on Youtube from the Oxford Martin School

By Evan Pye

This week I watched a video lecture by Professor Ian Goldin from the Oxford Martin School’s Youtube channel. Ian Goldin has recently published a book called The Pursuit of Development: Economic Growth, Social Change, and Ideas. I haven’t read the book, but I watched this lecture where he summarizes its contents and engages in a discussion with the audience. Goldin claims that the book is useful to beginners as well as those experienced with the idea of development. He begins by defining development as it relates to human, social, and economic progress. Previously, development was measured primarily by GDP, but now new, more comprehensive measurement tools have emerged, including the UNDP’s Human Development Index, the Happiness Index, and the Social Progress Index. Although wealth is becoming a lesser component of what is known as “development,” it is still worth noting that 900 million people currently live in extreme poverty, which has recently been re-defined by the World Bank as $1.90 per day.

After defining “development,” Ian Goldin discussed the past several decades of the aid industry and the mistakes it has made. He suggests that many people have a bad impression of aid, because so many projects have turned out to be failures in the past. Nevertheless, he argues that the international community has learned many lessons in the midst of these failures and that aid today is better spent than ever before. In fact, aid per capita from rich countries is apparently half of what it was in the 1980s, because of the improvements in donating, receiving, and tracking aid money. That’s not to say that rich countries shouldn’t be giving more money. The United Kingdom is the world’s only country that has committed by law 0.7% of its GDP to official development assistance, and it is one of only three countries that gives that large a portion of its GDP.

Goldin jumps around to a lot of different topics in this lecture because he only had 45 minutes to speak about his book, so I’ll highlight a mix of some of his points that stuck with me. First, he used Ghana and South Korea as an example of how rapidly development can change a country’s economy. In 1960, those two nations had the same average income levels. Today, South Korea is 11 times richer than Ghana. On the flip side, Argentina was the world’s 7th richest country 100 years ago – today it is the 56th richest country. China has doubled its average income per capita every 10 years for the past 35 years. To demonstrate the levels of intra-national economic disparity, Goldin points to the fact that some states in India have average per capita incomes of $10,000, while others have incomes of just $500. In terms of global inequities, he points to the migrant crisis, climate change, and the vulnerability of the poor as important issues to consider. Finally, he brought up the “resource curse,” explaining how some (but not all) countries with considerable resources, such as oil or minerals, have been exploited and forced to suffer from violent conflicts. Goldin says that “conflict is development in reverse,” because it tears down everything development aims to accomplish.

This lecture was a really good overview of a lot of topics surrounding sustainable development, and it made me very interested in reading The Pursuit of Development and other books by Ian Goldin. I would also highly suggest subscribing to the Oxford Martin School’s Youtube channel, which is full of lectures by experts and professors in the most interesting fields (technology, climate change, health, poverty, etc).

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